Dating stanley transitional planes

The reasons for that are discussed on the FAQ page. It has been tastefully, and carefully cleaned and rehabbed. The #105 was first issued in 1876 to commemorate the Centennial. It has a steel body and the typical adjuster for the cutter that liberty bell planes have. This A 5 Jack Plane dates from the mid 20's to mid 30's. Stanley made and sold a few different Aluminum planes and other tools back in the 20's and 30's.

Stanley introduced there line of steel planes in the mid 20's when they stopped making the liberty bell line of planes. The #104 was first issued in 1876 to commemorate the Centennial. It looks to have been repainted but is not pitted or rusty. It has a great rosewood handle and is in overall very nice condition. They made an aluminum version of the #18 block plane, the #78 and the #45, some levels, a brace, as well as these three different size bench planes, the A4, the A5, & the A6.

The original Stanley Gage line of metal bench planes was numbered 3 through 7, sizes that compared to their Bailey counterparts.

The G prefix was added in 1930 to distinguish them from the Bailey line (G3 through G7C). No “G” prefix to the model number Type 2 (1924-1930) – “Pat. Plane beds are now marked with Schade’s 2-17-20 patent date.

Given the G3 Designation, and the patent info cast into the bed, this would be considered a ype 3 dating from the 1930's.

They were never a great success with the user crowd of the day given you could buy a Bedrock for about the same money. This G3 Gage jack plane is in overall nice condition.

The outer part of the cap serves as the lever cap, with the inner piece functioning as a chipbreaker.

The mechanism is adjustable via a two-screw slide to bring it closer to the edge of the blade.It has a wonderful Rosewood handle and original knob.The tag indicates it came from Bob Kaune back in the late 90's.This is an earlier type with a strange cutter logo. The background story on these planes can be in many references.Given that and the handle shape I assume this is a Type 1 They ended production in 1918. They were first issued in 1876, and production ceased in 1918 at the close of WWI.Meant for use in locals such as schools or manual training classes where damage was likely to occur if dropped as the steel sides would not crack or break. Front knob looks to be a replacement, and there is a bit of loss to the top of the rear handle. The #104 was first issued in 1876 to commemorate the Centennial. It has a steel body and the typical adjuster for the cutter that liberty bell planes have. Each has been fitted with one of Stanley's aftermarket aluminum handles that were typically offered separately. This unusual plane is in super original condition and has all the original and proper parts that it should.